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March 1, 2015  RSS feed
Reduce your risk for colorectal cancer
     Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in both the United States and Canada. So say the American Cancer Society and the Canadian Cancer Society, who project nearly 60,000 Americans and Canadians will lose their lives to colorectal cancer in 2015 alone.
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Monmouth Medical Center launches Picture My Smile Photography Program
     The Unterberg Children’s Hospital at Monmouth Medical Center, a Barnabas Health facility, recently launched Picture My Smile, a program that empowers chronically ill pediatric patients ages 6 through 17 to express their voice through the art of photography .
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New study finds that weight loss surgery prolongs life
     A new study recently reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that weight loss surgery appears to prolong life for severely obese adults.Among 2,500 obese adults who underwent bariatric surgery, the death rate was about 14 percent after 10 years compared with almost 24 percent for obese patients who didn’t have weight-loss surgery, researchers found.
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Warning signs women should not ignore
     I doubt anyone will argue they have a busier schedule than most women today.Their day-to-day responsibilities rival that of any Fortune 500 CEO, to be sure. But it’s critical that women also take time to stay on top of their own health.
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Why are more young people getting colon cancer?
     As a result of increasing numbers of people age 50+ choosing to undergo screenings for colorectal cancer — the standard screening age — incidences have been slowly decreasing every year since the 1980s. However, diagnoses for people under 50 have been increasing and are often diagnosed when the disease has advanced to later stages.
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Why we feel tired at the start of Daylight Savings Time
     Daylight savings time is upon us, and it’s that time of year when everyone complains how tired they are because they lost one hour of sleep.Though everyone eventually accommodates for the change, the subtle one-hour difference is quite substantial, and can lead to all sorts of problems, primarily daytime sleepiness.
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The Resiliency Program offers help for those suffering from PTSD and anxiety
     Dr. Steven Zodkoy of Monmouth Advanced Medicine, Freehold, has teamed up with Soldier On to provide free care for veterans, soldiers and their families suffering with anxiety, burnout, depression and PTSD.
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Sinus infections: To treat or not to treat
     The paranasal sinuses are air spaces within the facial bones that communicate with the nasal passages through narrow channels.They are lined by respiratory-type cells that both produce mucus and move it along through the motion of cilia, tiny hair-like projections on the surface of these cells.
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Sports hernia can be difficult to diagnose; primarily effects hockey players
     Sports hernia, also known as hockey groin or athletic pubalgia, describes a condition characterized by unilateral persistent groin pain, often in an athlete, without a true hernia. It was described initially in Europe, and has become a common diagnosis in high intensity sports, especially in youths and collegiate athletes.
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Eight superfoods to help you maintain a healthy weight
     Superfoods build bones, prevent chronic diseases, improve your eyesight, and even keep your mind sharp. But did you know new evidence suggests eating moderate amounts of these foods can also help you feel full for longer and maintain a healthy weight?
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Center for Wound Healing helps the father of the bride make a dream come true
     Last winter, 58-year old Joe Veloce of Staten Island threw on a pair of sneakers to go out and brush the ice and snow from his wife’s car. His sneakers got wet; he slipped and banged his foot. Although he didn’t think he was injured, Joe’s foot became swollen, and the arch of his foot was red and very sore. Joe developed frostbite, which led to an infection.
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The myth about root canal therapy
     Root canal therapy is a sequence of treatments used to eliminate infection from the pulp of a tooth.The pulp chambers are the hollow spaces deep within the tooth that contain nerves, blood vessels, and other structures. Root canals are one of the most widely used methods to clean infected teeth and avoid painful and costly tooth extractions.
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Grant enables Rutgers CINJ investigators to explore melanoma metastasis
     The mechanism by which small cellular vesicles promote melanoma metastasis (spread of disease), will be further explored by investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University.A recently awarded $200,000 grant (R21CA185835) from the National Cancer Institute to researchers Suzie Chen, Ph.D., and James S.
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10 big brain-related breakthroughs of 2014
     This was a big year on the brain front. From brain injury and brain training toAlzheimer’s and autism, neuroscientists are unraveling more mysteries surrounding the human brain, and discovering new treatments and preventative methods in the process. In celebration of Brain Awareness Month, here are 10 of the biggest brain breakthroughs from 2014.
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More than just a slip on the ice
     Black ice.That is what caused the elderly woman to fall and break her hip. However, this woman had a less apparent risk factor than her slippery sidewalk: osteoporosis.According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, approximately 9 million osteoporotic fractures happen every year, worldwide.
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What’s best for back pain?
     Anyone who has ever suffered with low back pain will tell you it is not to be taken lightly. It can range from an ache that frustrates and limits you from doing the things that are important to you, to a crippling, disabling pain that holds your life hostage. Back pain affects about 1 out of every 4 United States adults. It’s costly.
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Study finds that weight loss surgery prolongs life
     A new study recently reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association finds that weight loss surgery appears to prolong life for severely obese adults. Among 2,500 obese adults who underwent bariatric surgery, the death rate was about 14 percent after 10 years compared with almost 24 percent for obese patients who didn’t have weight-loss surgery, researchers found.
More ...

The key to long-term fitness is enjoying what you do
     Ever hear Generation Xers speak about their childhoods and summer vacations? Filled with an endless array of activities, those months felt so much longer. From stick ball and tennis to biking and swimming, it seemed like every day brought a new opportunity for fun and entertainment. For most, playtime was optional, varied and so much more enjoyable.
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Benefits of the revolutionary AlterG anti-gravity treadmill
     During my 25-year career as a physical therapist, there have been very few devices that have come to market that have immediately benefited a large segment of the rehabilitation population as theAlterG anti-gravity treadmill. Developed in 2005 by founder Sean Whalen, the treadmill utilizes the NASA patented differential air pressure unweighting technology.
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Nurses reverse a worrisome winter development
     In mid-December, three residents in the River Road, Piscataway, Parker nursing home caught an upper respiratory virus. Such viruses can cause residents to miss much-anticipated group activities and runs the risk of broad transmission through the home.
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10 big brain-related breakthroughs of 2014
     This was a big year on the brain front. From brain injury and brain training to Alzheimer’s and autism, neuroscientists are unraveling more mysteries surrounding the human brain, and discovering new treatments and preventative methods in the process. In celebration of Brain Awareness Month, here are 10 of the biggest brain breakthroughs from 2014.
More ...

Grant enables Rutgers CINJ investigators to explore melanoma metastasis
     The mechanism by which small cellular vesicles promote melanoma metastasis (spread of disease), will be further explored by investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy at Rutgers University.A recently awarded $200,000 grant (R21CA185835) from the National Cancer Institute to researchers Suzie Chen, Ph.D., and James S.
More ...